Computer Building Guide Tips

Computer Building Guide Tips

This will help you understand a computer so you can build one.

Video at bottom of guide.

First off http://www.newegg.com/ is like the best site (not amazon) for finding PC components to build a computer. Amazon is pretty good for ordering the components, but if your to look something up just use newegg their the best they are also nice to order from.

With this list of tips we & I think that you will most certainly have a higher chance of success, and won’t get the wrong parts to go with one another, and won’t miss anything at that!

1st! Have a budget!

When deciding on a budget you need to decide first how much can you realistically spend. $200~$400 for a run of the mill internet and streaming PC is about standard. $500~$1000 will get you a low-budget to medium budget gaming, media, and entertainment PC, and $1100~$6000 will get you a high end computer that can do everything including play the latest games for years to come. This is from a desktop ONLY reference.

A note on the budget this assumes that you are going from nothing to a whole computer. If you have an existing computer upgrades are easy, and can be found at this article LINK instead.

2nd! Decide on a brand

By “brand” we mean Intel or AMD. Intel & AMD make CPUs (Central Processing Units), which are the brains of a computer. Determine the “brain” will determine other components the computer will comprise of. Their a few key differences I’ll outline below

AMD

  • Cheaper
  • More “Bang for your buck.”
  • Generally more cores
  • APU Technology
  • “Mantel”
  • Good track record

Intel

  • Pricey
  • Generally out preforms AMD
  • Very efficient
  • Excellent track record
  • Highly efficient hyper-threading
  • Less Cores

So as you can see AMD is more for the PC builder wanting to watch their budget but still receive excellent performance. Intel is more for the enthusiast looking for maximum performance, and efficiency. I myself have a computer comprised of an AMD processor with the associated motherboard, and GPU (Graphics Processing Unit). All together (with an eBay deal I snagged) cost me around $1000~$1200 total. My computer can play all games with ease, and can perform excellently though an Intel i7 processor could probably outperform me even if only marginally.

APU Technology on the AMD side means that the CPU can handle operations that normally a graphics card would do. Mantel is AMD’s version of DirectX.

3rd! Know what makes a computer “work”

Okay so after deciding on a brand of processor you’l want you need to understand all of the components that will go together to make your final piece – a functioning computer. Below I’ll list everything you need to make a computer work.

  • Computer Case
  • Motherboard
  • CPU – Central Processing Unit
  • RAM – Random Access Memory
  • HDD – Hard Disk Drive
    • SSD – Solid State Drive (For Operating System)
  • PSU – Power Supply Unity
  • CD/DVD ROM Drive – For CDs/DVDs
  • Graphics Card

Now I’ll cover this list in more detail so you understand. The computer case is what will house everything and will generally cost around $20~$100 depending on the brand. The motherboard runs about the same as the case. The thing to considering with the motherboard is the socket type. For example my motherboard takes an AMD Processor. The AMD Socket it accepts are AM3, and AM3+. You don’t have to understand what that means just understand when looking for a processor that it needs to have the correct socket type in order to be used with your motherboard. So if the CPU your looking at says FM2+ it WILL NOT fit a motherboard that say it only accepts AM3/AM3+. Some motherboards are more versatile than others and will accept more socket types than others so be aware of this.

Don’t forget to get thermal paste with your CPU. Generally though your CPU will likely come with some already pre-applied, or if you get an aftermarket heatsink it will come with some as well. The best thermal paste is “Artic Silver”.

Intel & AMD CPU’s are not interchangeable, they won’t even fit eachother because again different sockets won’t fit eachother. If you somehow managed to get a different CPU forced into a wrong socket well you probably just broke your CPU and motherboard. So take things slow, and review your components specifications sheets always!

RAM is pretty easy to get, use, and install. All you need to know is the socket type that the motherboard takes for the RAM other than that it does not matter the company or brand. So if it says DDR3 than you can only use DDR3 RAM you can’t go backwards and you can’t go forward. Within DDR3 RAM you will likely incounter different speeds, and sizes. Just go with 2 medium cost 4 Gigabyte RAM sticks.

HDD stands for hard-disk drive, and is where all your information will be stored. Just make sure you get the right size at the right speed and your set. You could also consider an SSD to use as your main Windows Boot Drive, which won’t be covered in this guide.

PSU is your power supply. When your looking for one just make sure it gets at least 80% efficiency or is rated at least Bronze80. Otherwise generally 750~1000 Watts is good if building more on the high end. On the lower end 500 Watts should work.

You will likely want a CD/DVD drive for obvious reasons we won’t cover just get a cheap one in case you use or need to use a CD/DVD.

The graphics cards will determine how well your computer can render 3D and 2D images, and graphics. If your going for a cheap computer just about any card should work fine. If your going for a more high end computer you’l appropriately need a better graphics card. Also generally AMD is paired with RADEON Graphics Cards, and Intel is paired with Nvidia Graphics cards. Below is a list of their best cards currently at the time of writing this.

  • AMD/RADEON – 290X2 ($1000+)
  • Intel/Nvidia – GTX Titan ($1000+)

Well that about sums everything up. While this guide is full of tips, and information it does not include pictures. Though you should have a solid understanding now before making any purchases. Below is a video created by someone else other than us that shows how to assemble a computer after you have gotten your components.

http://www.prenticenetwork.com/

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