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RGB vs CMYK

RGB vs CMYK

If your unsure of which to use than your in the right place.

RGB vs CMYK
Image taken from: kb.mcad,edu

 

RGB – Red, Green, Blue

RGB is an additive coloring method. These three colors can form any color in existence, but the problem is that ink cartridges do not come in RGB.

RBG is the color scheme that is associated with electronic displays such as CRT, and LCD monitors, digital cameras, and scanners.

RGB is an additive type of color scheme. It combines all three primary colors together (red, green, and blue) in various degrees to create a variety of different colors. For example white is when all three colors are combined together. When they are applied together at the lowest degree possible you get black.

Many photo editing software’s use RGB because it offers the widest range of colors to choose from. This is why you never see CMYK used in digital applications that are not designed to ever touch paper.

Pro tip: Photoshop (Raster Graphics) – Defaults to RGB

Pro tip: To avoid any discoloration when printing something make sure to convert the color mode of your image to CMYK before printing. If it is for something simple though usually the computer can handle the conversion and print what you see on screen just fine.

CMYK – Cyan, Magneta, Yellow, Black

CMYK is a subtractive coloring method. Printers print in CMYK mode even if the image your printing is in RGB. CMYK is a four color mode that uses the colors of cyan, magneta, yellow, and black together in all different degrees to create the desired colors.

It is a subtractive process, which means that each additional unique color means more light is removed, or absorbed, to create colors.

When the first three colors are added together you do not get black, but actually a very dark brown. The fourth color black is used to completely remove light from the printed picture so you perceive that area as black.

Pro tip: Adobe Illustrator (Vector Graphics) – Defaults to CMYK

Note some information was taken from http://www.overnightprints.com/

Thanks for viewing my post either on my website or on someone else’s as a re-post. You can find me originally at http://www.dengan.net/

AMD’s APUs.

AMD’s APUs.

AMD APU
Image taken from: http://eecatalog.com/

AMD APU’s are the latest greatest thing from AMD. They are as seen in the above image a hybrid of a CPU and a GPU. This has many benefits, and a few drawbacks. This really is a great innovation, but more so for laptops, and tablets not really desktop computers. An APU can work with an AMD Graphics card if one is installed on the same machine, and together can help each other make your applications, and games run smoother.

However once you get more into the enthusiast area where you want to start using high end cards like the AMD 290, 290X, or 295X2 than things change. At this point you would be better off having a dedicated CPU, and a dedicated GPU. If you turned on the options that allow the APU to work with your GPU and your GPU just so happens to be a high end card like the few we listed than your APU will be a major bottleneck to your performance.

Currently one of the best processors you can get from AMD that will get you tons of performance is the FX-8350 (Not an affiliate link). It is a fast eight core processor that runs at 4.0Ghz with some variation in different models.

AMD – Radeon products are known to run hotter, and use more power than Intel – Nvidia products, but you get what you pay for. AMD – Radeon products usually cost between 20%-50% less than the competition. Note that this is only an evaluation of consumer grade processors and graphics cards not commercial grade or server grade.

If you are going to settle for an APU go with the A10-7850K.

amd-apuOtherwise if your going with a dedicated CPU – GPU build than choose this processor.

amd-cpuBoth chooses are good considering they are pretty much top tier consumer grade products which by all standards are cheap as far as price is concerned, and high as far as quality is concerned. You really can’t go wrong with either one. I myself have a FX8350 with a after-market CPU cooler and I could not be happier.

My brother has an AMD A10-7850K with a stock cooler, and could not be happier though his processor with the stock cooler does run a little hot but nothing to the point that is concerning. At 100% full load the APU did reach higher temperatures than my FX8350.

So again in conclusion they are both good options, but personally I would go with the FX8350. For more news, updates, posts, and reviews check back here at https://md5live.com/